Flotsam & Jetsam

Words & Images for Creative Sailors

We shall not cease from exploration./And the end of all our exploring./Will be to arrive where we started./And know the place for the first time.
~T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets


Where are you from? It’s a question that trips easily off our tongues when we first get to know someone. We ask it eagerly because we understand that both the question and the answer are more complicated than they seem. In asking it, we invite stories about where people grew up, where they’ve lived and traveled, their family history and, ultimately, who they are. It’s the kind of question that begins conversation, a dialogue of further inquiry and discussion that helps us learn more about our differences and commonalities. It’s why, when someone says, “I don’t understand where you’re coming from,” it’s a signal you need to talk. Telling your story might be a good place to start.

~excerpt from Gold Boat Journeys’ Ship’s Log (aka Slog) by littlegoldboat. This is the introduction to one of the site’s Monday Mind Trip exercises for writers.
Climb Aboard:
faceboat
twitter (goodnewsmuse)
twitter (littlegoldboat)
Pinterest

We shall not cease from exploration./And the end of all our exploring./Will be to arrive where we started./And know the place for the first time.

~T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Where are you from? It’s a question that trips easily off our tongues when we first get to know someone. We ask it eagerly because we understand that both the question and the answer are more complicated than they seem. In asking it, we invite stories about where people grew up, where they’ve lived and traveled, their family history and, ultimately, who they are. It’s the kind of question that begins conversation, a dialogue of further inquiry and discussion that helps us learn more about our differences and commonalities. It’s why, when someone says, “I don’t understand where you’re coming from,” it’s a signal you need to talk. Telling your story might be a good place to start.

~excerpt from Gold Boat Journeys’ Ship’s Log (aka Slog) by littlegoldboat. This is the introduction to one of the site’s Monday Mind Trip exercises for writers.

Climb Aboard:

faceboat

twitter (goodnewsmuse)

twitter (littlegoldboat)

Pinterest

  1. littlegoldboat posted this
blog comments powered by Disqus